Musicians

Daniel S. Lee Violin



Helicon Performances

Symposium 112 - The Grand Concerto
Symposium 103 - “Gloria and Furore” Music of the Italian Baroque

Daniel S. Lee performs as a violinist, violist, and conductor in period and conventional performances in repertoire ranging from the 12th to 21st centuries. His interest in academia and research supplements his active participation in historically informed early music performances, while his avid promotion of new music has led to premiere performances of commissioned works.

Following his Carnegie Hall debut in 1999 as a soloist with Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, he has had a varied career as a recitalist, chamber musician, concertmaster, and teacher. He has performed as a soloist and guest concertmaster with the American Baroque Orchestra, New York Baroque Incorporated, Quodlibet Ensemble, Trinity Baroque Orchestra and Musica Raritana at Rutgers. From the podium, he has worked with instrumentalists, singers, as well as dancers as the music director of the Albano Ballet, the artistic director of the Sebastian Chamber Players/Orchestra, and the choir director of the New Haven Korean Church.

Born into a musical family, he is a third-generation violinist and conductor. Following his initial musical studies with his father, Soo Chul Lee, at the age of three, he attended the Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music, and Yale School of Music studying with Stephen Clapp, Patinka Kopec, and Ani Kavafian, respectively. He has also studied the viola with Toby Appel and Jesse Levine and harmony and counterpoint with Kendall Briggs. As a conductor, he has been coached by Marin Alsop, Charles Dutoit, Harold Farberman, Gustav Meier, and Otto-Werner Mueller. He is currently working towards his Doctor of Musical Arts degree as a student of Theodore Arm at the University of Connecticut. He was a visiting fellow in early music for the 2009-2010 academic year at Yale University under the guidance of Robert Mealy. He is on the violin/viola faculty at Connecticut College. He was the Audience Prize winner of the 2012 Early Music American Baroque Performance Competition, and a finalist in the 2011 York International Early Music Competition and the 2011 Early Music American/Naxos Recording Competition.